It costs how much?

explaining the cost of art

One of the things I truly dislike about being an artist is telling potential buyers how much my art costs.  I am often glad that I am hidden behind my computer screen.  This being said I wanted to explain why art directly from an artist costs more.

  1. We are not mass producing our art.  Yes, you can go to Kohl’s, target or an online store and buy art much cheaper.  But when you do this you are purchasing something mass produced.  Something that is not unique.  Something that millions of other people have in their home.  Stores can sell their art so cheap because they buy in bulk.
  2. Art supplies are not cheap.  Big box stores get discounts on their ink and other materials.  I watch for sales on canvases at my local art store, and purchase my paint online.  I try to offer options other than framing, to help with cost, but overall my supplies are very costly.
  3. Shipping isn’t really free.  I put in a reasonable amount in the price, but if I sell across the country, I lose money.  Yes, I could make shipping a line item, but how many purchases do you make when you have to pay for shipping?  I skip items that charge for shipping too!
  4. Time…. I don’t even calculate this.  Some times a painting flies off my brush, and then there are times that I am pulling my hair out.

How do I come up with my prices?

I use a formula given to me years ago.  Then I tweak it to make it more reasonable.  I try to keep the same prices for each size, as how would you feel if you hear that others got your same painting for much less?

I do sell some older paintings at a reduced rate…..sometimes its about it getting the right home.  Usually if they don’t sell, I paint over them.  But some paintings I just can’t bring myself to paint over, so I wait patiently for its owner to claim it. I do also offer other options, such as prints for those that really love a piece but just can’t afford it.

So the next time you see a painting for more than you expected, I hope you will remember the reasons behind it.  And if you decide to purchase the painting, you will be making an artist very happy.  It takes a lot to create, and continue trying to create.

And think of how you would feel if someone came to your job and offered you less for your work. Or scoffed at you.  This is my job.  I am trying to pay for my supplies, and make a living.  Not get rich, but make a living doing something I love.

Thank you to those that understand and purchase art for their home.

roy g biv-sm.jpg

 

 

 

The art of brush strokes

Brush strokes within a painting create art

Have you ever studied a painting?  I am sure you have looked at a painting…. but have you ever looked close at the brush strokes that created the painting?  Probably not.  I am not finding fault, I did not look myself, before I started painting.  But now I certainly do.  Because from afar you are just enjoying the painting, and maybe don’t realize the work that went into creating that painting.

Let’s think about how that painting was created.  An artist picked up a brush, dipped it in paint, and swirled it onto a canvas.  Sometimes they used a large brush to cover more of the canvas, and sometimes they used a smaller brush for detail.  No matter what the size of the brush, it was an implement to get the paint on the canvas.

blooming-flowers
a closeup of some flowers.

While the artist used that brush, she also stepped back from the canvas, to see what it looked like overall.  To see how the brush strokes blended.  If they were creating what the artist intended. Because up close the strokes don’t always look like much.

bloomingshrub
a closeup of some shrubs

So hopefully you now realize that it is a little harder than it looks.  Sometimes it works well, and sometimes we have to start over.  Either way, its a wonderful thing to create, and I am so thankful that I get to work these brushstrokes to create art.

blooming
Overall painting with areas shown above, available in my etsy  shoppe